Aerial View of a Houses

CCRE / UC CENTER SACRAMENTO:
Protecting California Homes
from Extreme Heat 

California housing is unprepared for extreme heat today and future increases in duration and intensity expected under climate change. This presentation recommends the following interconnected actions to protect Californians where they live:
 

  1. Update habitability standards and residential building codes for a hotter future

  2. Bolster funding for the installation and use of home cooling strategies

  3. Address policy and programming gaps to protect the most heat-vulnerable populations.

Professor V. Kelly Turner’s research addresses the relationship between institutions, urban design, and the environment. Dr. Turner’s work on water resources has investigated the co-benefits of heat mitigation and water conservation through sustainable design. More recently, Professor Turner is investigating the role of policy, planning, and social norms in driving adoption of green versus grey stormwater control measures in several U.S. cities and the cumulative effects on watershed hydrology through a collaborative study. Dr. Turner received a Ph.D. in geography from the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University. Professor Turner’s work is funded by the National Science Foundation and the interdisciplinary National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center. Dr. Turner recently chaired the Human Dimensions of Global Change specialty group of the American Association of Geographers.

  • Oct. 19, 2022, 12 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

    Zoom link will be provided to registrants prior to the event

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DR. V. KELLY TURNER

Assistant Professor, Urban Planning and Geography, UCLA

co-Director, Luskin Center for Innovation

CCRE / UC CENTER SACRAMENTO EVENT:
California's Housing Crisis: Policies for a More Affordable, Equitable and Sustainable Housing Future 

California faces a housing crisis of extraordinary scale and complexity.  High rents and home prices — coupled with the lingering impacts of the COVID pandemic — are contributing to housing insecurity, high rates of homelessness, and deepening racial inequality.  The politics of housing in the state can also feel intractable: cities continue to rely on exclusionary zoning tactics to thwart new supply, while developers, labor unions, NIMBYs, YIMBYs, environmentalists, and tenant advocates all stake out conflicting positions of what is needed to increase affordability and sustainability. This presentation will review the origins of California’s housing crisis, its implications, and lift up the policies that will be needed to chart a course to improved affordability, greater household stability, increased racial equity, and reduced homelessness across the state.​

Dr. Carolina K. Reid is the I. Donald Terner Distinguished Professor in Affordable Housing and Urban Policy in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of California at Berkeley. Professor Reid specializes in housing and community development, with a specific focus on access to credit, housing and mortgage markets, urban poverty, and racial inequality. Dr. Reid’s work seeks to inform state and federal policy, and she has consulted on projects for state and federal agencies. Professor Reid’s scholarship has been covered in national and international media, including The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and National Public Radio. Before joining the faculty at UC Berkeley, Dr. Reid  worked at the Center for Responsible Lending, and as a Research Manager for the Community Development Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco for six years, where, Professor Reid published numerous journal and policy articles on topics related to housing and community development.

  • Nov. 9, 2022, 12 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

    Zoom link will be provided to registrants prior to the event

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DR. CAROLINA K. REID

I. Donald Terner Distinguished Professor in Affordable Housing and Urban Policy, Department of City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley

CCRE WORKSHOP SERIES:
LEADERSHIP IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Interested in learning more about local government and how to get involved in politics at the local level? In partnership with Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy, C.A.R.’s Center for California Real Estate (CCRE) presents a new educational opportunity for C.A.R. members. Under the direction of Public Policy Dean Pete Peterson, this series will be offered virtually and is free for C.A.R. members.
 

Each six-week workshop will be divided into two parts. The first three sessions explore how local governments operate, how they’re funded, and how policy decisions get made. The following three sessions focus on how to run for local office, including how to decide which office to run for, what to consider prior to deciding whether to run, and how to run a campaign, raise funds and build political networks.  

This workshop will occur weekly:

  • Aug. 16 – Sept. 20; Tuesdays, 2 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

 

SERIES INSTRUCTORS:

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MAUREEN TOBIN
Executive Director 

Davenport Institute for Public Engagement and Civic Leadership

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MATT BRONSON
City Manager

City of Grover Beach

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POOJA BACHANI DI GIOVANNA
Assistant Director for Professional Education

Davenport Institute for Public Engagement and Civic Leadership

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YVETTE SENNEWALD
Senior Planner for the City of Camas and Advisory Council Member, Davenport Institute for Public Engagement and Civic Leadership

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RICK BISHOP
Vice President of Acquisitions

National CORE

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RICK COLE
Executive Director

Congress for New Urbanism

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ANDREW MARC DI GIOVANNA
Founder and CEO

Magna Carta Libertatum